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Kyle Rittenhouse’s family: We’re his collateral damage
www.thedailybeast.com Kyle Rittenhouse’s Family: We’re His Collateral Damage

The far-right darling is accused of leaving his mom and sister high and dry as they fight eviction.

Kyle Rittenhouse’s Family: We’re His Collateral Damage

The far-right darling is accused of leaving his mom and sister high and dry as they fight eviction.

Kyle Rittenhouse has been publicly dragged by his own family, who say the far-right darling has left them high and dry as his mother and sister brace for eviction from their home.

Faith, Kyle’s sister, put out a desperate plea for help on May 29, setting up a GoFundMe to help fight their eviction notice.

“With my brother’s unwillingness to provide support or contribute to our family, we’ve been left to navigate this journey on our own,” she added.

Her family has “exhausted every resource available to us,” she wrote, and “time is running out.”

When I was in the hospital we tried to like talk to my brother, we tried to like to tell his lawyer to tell like my brother like I was maybe needing surgery or like I was in the hospital, I never heard from him,” Faith told viewers of the V-Radio podcast.

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Trump floats ‘migrant league of fighters’ in latest dehumanizing rhetoric against migrants
www.cnn.com Trump floats ‘migrant league of fighters’ in latest dehumanizing rhetoric against migrants | CNN Politics

Former President Donald Trump on Saturday said he floated the idea of having a “migrant league of fighters” to UFC President Dana White, again employing dehumanizing language to describe people who enter the US illegally.

Trump floats ‘migrant league of fighters’ in latest dehumanizing rhetoric against migrants | CNN Politics

Former President Donald Trump on Saturday said he floated the idea of having a “migrant league of fighters” to UFC President Dana White, again employing dehumanizing language to describe people who enter the US illegally.

“I said, ‘Dana, I have an idea: Why don’t you set up a migrant league of fighters and have your regular league of fighters. And then you have the champion of your league — these are the greatest fighters in the world — fight the champion of the migrants. I think the migrants’ guy might win, that’s how tough they are,” the presumptive GOP presidential nominee said at a gathering of Christian conservatives in Washington.

Trump added, “He didn’t like that idea too much, but actually, it’s not the worst idea I’ve ever had.”

The former president repeated the comments at a campaign rally in Philadelphia later Saturday.

President Joe Biden’s campaign swiftly denounced the comments Saturday afternoon.

Fitting that convicted felon Donald Trump spent his time at a religious conference threatening to round up Latinos, bragging about ripping away Americans’ freedoms, and promising to be even more extreme if he regains power,” spokesperson Sarafina Chitika said. “Trump’s incoherent, unhinged tirade showed voters in his own words that he is a threat to our freedoms and is too dangerous to be let anywhere near the White House again.”

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Virginia proposed changes to African American history course, documents show

The elective course was reviewed to see if it complied with Youngkin executive order banning ‘inherently divisive concepts

Virginia’s education department proposed dozens of revisions to an elective course on African American history, striking some references to white supremacy and systemic racism among other changes, documents show.

A spokesman for the state education department said the review is still ongoing, and no changes have been implemented yet. But some professors involved in the creation of the earlier curriculum are concerned that the proposed revisions would dilute some of the topics and language explored in the course if implemented.

The department has not publicly released the proposed changes, which were submitted last August. The review was revealed in public records obtained by watchdog group American Oversight and shared with The Washington Post.

The proposed revisions were part of a review of whether the African American history elective complied with Republican Gov. Glenn Youngkin’s executive order banning “inherently divisive concepts” from the classroom.

Non-paywall link

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english.elpais.com The battle for lithium: US and China fight over Argentina’s white gold

President Javier Milei is making the most of the global competition to ensure access to a mineral that is critical to making batteries for energy storage and EVs. Residents of boom towns wonder how long it will last

The battle for lithium: US and China fight over Argentina’s white gold

Nearly untouched for millions of years, the salt flats of the inhospitable Puna plateaus are being transformed into a dynamic center of lithium production, bringing with them both economic opportunities and concerns about environmental damage. North of the ruins of Mina La Casualidad, several heavy-duty trucks cross the mountains towards the Mariana mine, a large lithium project under construction, operated by the Chinese company Ganfeng, one of the largest producers of lithium in the world.

The mine is one of the five projects that the lithium giant is carrying out in Argentina, a country that has become the scene of a strategic rivalry between China and the United States, where both seek to obtain the necessary supplies for the manufacture of batteries.

Argentina, the fourth largest lithium producer in the world, holds a fifth of the world’s reserves. It is the second largest deposit on the planet. As the country’s production soars, both Beijing and Washington want to take a piece of Argentina’s “white gold.”

China, the main producer of lithium batteries and the country that refines the most lithium in the world, has a clear advantage when it comes to investing in Argentina’s nascent industry. But the U.S., which is seeking to develop its own clean technology production chains outside of Chinese control, is trying to counter Beijing’s growing influence in South America with new investments.

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Experts: US hospitals prone to cyberattacks like one that hurt patient care at Ascension
kffhealthnews.org Experts: US Hospitals Prone to Cyberattacks Like One That Hurt Patient Care at Ascension - KFF Health News

Clinicians working for Ascension hospitals in multiple states described harrowing lapses, including delayed or lost lab results, medication errors, and an absence of routine safety checks to prevent potentially fatal mistakes.

Experts: US Hospitals Prone to Cyberattacks Like One That Hurt Patient Care at Ascension - KFF Health News

In the wake of a debilitating cyberattack against one of the nation’s largest health care systems, Marvin Ruckle, a nurse at an Ascension hospital in Wichita, Kansas, said he had a frightening experience: He nearly gave a baby “the wrong dose of narcotic” because of confusing paperwork.

Ruckle, who has worked in the neonatal intensive care unit at Ascension Via Christi St. Joseph for two decades, said it was “hard to decipher which was the correct dose” on the medication record. He’d “never seen that happen,” he said, “when we were on the computer system” before the cyberattack.

A May 8 ransomware attack against Ascension, a Catholic health system with 140 hospitals in at least 10 states, locked providers out of systems that track and coordinate nearly every aspect of patient care. They include its systems for electronic health records, some phones, and ones “utilized to order certain tests, procedures and medications,” the company said in a May 9 statement.

More than a dozen doctors and nurses who work for the sprawling health system told Michigan Public and KFF Health News that patient care at its hospitals across the nation was compromised in the fallout of the cyberattack over the past several weeks. Clinicians working for hospitals in three states described harrowing lapses, including delayed or lost lab results, medication errors, and an absence of routine safety checks via technology to prevent potentially fatal mistakes.

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Social care: The crisis Britain’s politicians are too scared to discuss
www.politico.eu The crisis Britain’s politicians are too scared to discuss

Voters may want social care to be on the ballot at the UK general election, but no one seems to be listening.

The crisis Britain’s politicians are too scared to discuss

Voters may want social care to be on the ballot at the UK general election, but no one seems to be listening.

“They used to say Eastbourne was the place to go to die,” sighs a woman walking along the town’s main street.

A classic British seaside town, Eastbourne — 70 miles south of London, perched on the southern tip of Britain — is both beautiful and run down. White cliffs line the seafront, a tired arcade juts out upon the pier.

Eastbourne’s population is — there’s no sugarcoating it — old.

Around 25 percent of residents are aged 65 or over — far higher than the national average of 18.6 percent. In Eastbourne and the wider East Sussex area there are an estimated 69,000 unpaid carers looking after those in need. That means a national crisis which has long gripped the U.K. is keenly felt in this quiet, sun-struck corner of the south coast.

Britain’s adult social care sector has been in turmoil for as long as most can remember — soaring numbers of elderly people and chronic underfunding posing a public policy challenge met with a distinct lack of answers by several generations of politicians.

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www.politico.eu 12 countries push for EU crackdown on vapes

The European Commission has delayed action on tobacco and nicotine, but countries say it should consider a ban on flavored vapes.

12 countries push for EU crackdown on vapes

The European Commission has delayed action on tobacco and nicotine, but countries say it should consider a ban on flavored vapes.

Denmark is leading a charge for a European clampdown on vapes in a move the country says will protect children and young people from harm.

A total of 12 EU health ministers, led by Denmark’s Sophie Løhde, have backed a paper calling on the European Commission to propose new legislation, which could include banning flavored vapes and limiting nicotine content.

They also suggest that social media giants take "greater responsibility" for marketing and sales of vapes on their platforms.

The pressure on the Commission to act on vapes comes after the EU executive delayed its planned reform of tobacco and nicotine rules earlier this year.

The setback triggered a backlash from Belgium's Health Minister Frank Vandenbroucke, who told the European Parliament's health committee in January that industry lobbying was to blame for the Commission's inaction.

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apnews.com LGBTQ+ librarians grapple with attacks on books - and on themselves

Worldwide Pride Month events are underway but they are coming at a time when many people who identify as LGBTQ+ say they are facing increasing difficulties at work, ranging from being repeatedly misgendered to physically assaulted.

LGBTQ+ librarians grapple with attacks on books - and on themselves

Idaho librarian June Meissner was closing up for the day at the downtown Boise Public Library when a man approached her asking for help.

As an information services librarian, answering patrons’ questions is part of Meissner’s day-to-day work, and serving the community is one of her favorite parts of the job.

But when the man got close enough, “he took a swing at me and tried to punch me in the head,” said Meissner, a transgender woman. “I blocked it and he started yelling slurs and suggesting that he was going to come back and kill me.”

Worldwide Pride Month events are well underway to celebrate LGBTQ+ culture and rights. But it is coming at a time when people who identify as LGBTQ+ say they are facing increasing difficulties at work, ranging from being repeatedly misgendered to physically assaulted.

Gender nonconforming library workers in particular, like Meissner, are also grappling with growing calls for book bans across the U.S., with books about gender identity, sexual orientation and race topping the list of most criticized titles and making the attacks all the more personal.

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apnews.com Over 1,000 pilgrims died during this year's Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia, officials say

More than 1,000 people died during this year’s Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia as the faithful faced intense high temperatures at Islamic holy sites in the desert kingdom.

Over 1,000 pilgrims died during this year's Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia, officials say

More than 1,000 people died during this year’s Hajj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabiaas the faithful faced extreme high temperatures at Islamic holy sites in the desert kingdom, officials said Sunday.

More than half of the fatalities were people from Egypt, according to two officials in Cairo. Egypt revoked the licenses of 16 travel agencies that helped unauthorized pilgrims travel to Saudi Arabia, authorities said.

Saudi Arabia has not commented on the deaths during the pilgrimage, which is required of every able Muslim once in their life.

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www.theguardian.com Trump’s sledgehammer message to Philadelphia is light on facts, heavy on fear

The former president used his first rally in the city of brotherly love to tie violent crime with illegal immigration, despite the evidence against this

Trump’s sledgehammer message to Philadelphia is light on facts, heavy on fear

The former president used his first rally in the city of brotherly love to tie violent crime with illegal immigration, despite the evidence against this

Crooked Joe or Sleepy Joe? Donald Trump wanted to know which nickname his supporters prefer. “That’s the first time Sleepy Joe has ever beaten Crooked Joe!” he said with surprise, after asking the crowd to make noise for each contender.

That, however, is not the branding exercise the former US president cares about most right now. On Saturday night he wanted his followers to go home with three words: Biden. Migrant. Crime.

A month after his audacious campaign stop in the Bronx, New York, Trump held his first ever campaign rally in Philadelphia, the birthplace of American democracy and another Democratic stronghold where Joe Biden won 81.4% of the vote in 2020.

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Iran's water crisis leads to alarming ground collapse
www.dw.com Iran's water crisis leads to alarming ground collapse – DW – 06/19/2024

A drought in Iran is causing the ground to subside, threatening Tehran and hundreds of other towns.

Iran's water crisis leads to alarming ground collapse – DW – 06/19/2024

A drought in Iran is causing the ground to subside, threatening Tehran and hundreds of other towns.

More than 800 towns and villages, including the capital Tehran and the major city of Isfahan, are at risk from land subsidence, Iranian authorities say.

The ground beneath Tehran sinks by up to 22 centimeters (around 9 inches) every year, which is seven times higher than what would be normally expected.

The reason, experts say, is the country's acute water shortage.

"This is a serious crisis affecting at least half of Iranian society," said Roozbeh Eskandari, a Canadian-based expert on a hydraulic structures and dam construction.

Eskandari has long since warned about the consequences of Iran's water scarcity.

"Land subsidence resulting from unsustainable water consumption endangers the country's entire infrastructure, including pipelines, power lines and railroads," Eskandari told DW.

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Greece introduces the six-day work week
www.dw.com Greece introduces the six-day work week – DW – 06/21/2024

From the construction industry to the tourism sector, Greek employers cannot find the staff they need. The government's solution: longer working hours. A new law enables employers to implement a six-day work week

Greece introduces the six-day work week – DW – 06/21/2024

From the construction industry to the tourism sector, Greek employers cannot find the staff they need. The government's solution: longer working hours. A new law enables employers to implement a six-day work week

After 15 years of recession and austerity and three rescue packages that came with tough conditions attached, labor in Greece is no longer strictly regulated.

Collective agreements have been frozen for years, and in many businesses, staff work on the basis of individual employment contracts.

While the 40-hour work week is still officially in place, employers are permitted to require staff to work up to two unpaid hours per day for a limited period in return for more free time.

In theory, this additional work is voluntary. In reality, however, workers in many businesses and workplaces are forced to work longer hours without receiving any form of compensation.

The authorities — which are themselves short-staffed — rarely carry out checks to make sure that labor law is being observed. Making sure that the authorities can do such monitoring tasks effectively is not a priority for the conservative government of Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis.

But even before the law on the six-day work week comes into force on July 1, Greek workers work longer hours than any other workforce in Europe. With an average 41 hours per week, they work more than all other EU citizens, according to the EU's statistics agency, Eurostat. What's more, the pay they get for these long hours is low by European standards.

With a minimum monthly wage of €830($887), Greece ranks 15th in the EU in this respect. In terms of purchasing power, it ranks second last in Europe.

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www.nbcnews.com Putin threatens to arm North Korea, warns U.S. ally South against 'big mistake'

The Russian president said Friday that his country will continue to develop its nuclear arsenal, days after signing a new mutual defense pact with Kim Jong Un.

Putin threatens to arm North Korea, warns U.S. ally South against 'big mistake'

The Russian president said Friday that his country will continue to develop its nuclear arsenal, days after signing a new mutual defense pact with Kim Jong Un.

A key U.S. ally fired warning shots Friday — live ones to repel North Korean soldiers and a diplomatic volley to counter Russian President Vladimir Putin, as tensions rise after his new mutual defense pact with Kim Jong Un.

South Korea, which has so far only provided non-lethal aid to Ukraine, said it was considering arming Kyiv in response to a newly forged alliance between Moscow and Pyongyang reminiscent of the Cold War that has alarmed officials in the West.

Putin said that doing so would be a "very big mistake."

“If this happens, then we will also make appropriate decisions that the current leadership of South Korea would hardly like,” he said during his state visit to Vietnam on Thursday, which immediately followed the lavish Pyongyang visit. “We reserve our right to supply weapons to other regions of the world,” he added.

The Russian president's saber-rattling continued Friday, when he said that Russia will continue to develop its nuclear arsenal as a deterrent.

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A woman is accused of attempting to drown a 3-year-old child in possible hate crime incident
www.cnn.com A woman is accused of attempting to drown a 3-year-old child in possible hate crime incident | CNN

A woman in Texas has been charged with attempted capital murder and injury to a child after trying to drown a 3-year-old child at an apartment complex pool and making racial statements, according to police.

A woman is accused of attempting to drown a 3-year-old child in possible hate crime incident | CNN

A woman in Texas has been charged with attempted capital murder and injury to a child after trying to drown a 3-year-old child at an apartment complex pool and making racial statements, according to police.

The Texas chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations identified the family as Muslim and Palestinian and called on state and federal law enforcement authorities to investigate the incident “as a hate crime and take all precautions to keep the Muslim family and the Muslim community safe,” the organization said in a news release Friday.

On May 19, Euless Police Department officers responded to a call at an apartment complex pool regarding a disturbance between two women. Witnesses told officers “a woman who was very intoxicated had tried to drown a child and argued with the child’s mother,” police said in a news release.

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www.thedailybeast.com Trump’s Spiritual Adviser Resigns Amid Allegations He Molested 12-Year-Old

Robert Morris’ resignation comes days after he seemingly admitted to molesting a pre-teen in the 1980s, when he was already 20 with a wife and a kid.

Trump’s Spiritual Adviser Resigns Amid Allegations He Molested 12-Year-Old

Texas megachurch pastor Robert Morris, who Donald Trump once named as a spiritual adviser to his administration, announced he was stepping down from Gateway Church amid allegations he molested a 12-year-old girl in the 1980s.

The resignation comes days after Morris, 62, seemingly admitted to molesting the girl in a statement to The Christian Post. In that statement, he conceded that he engaged in “inappropriate sexual behavior” with a “young lady” when he was already married with a child in his early 20s.

Morris didn’t mention the girl’s age—but his alleged victim, Cindy Clemishire, told the religious watchdog blog The Wartburg Watch on Friday that she was only 12 when she was first sexually abused by Morris on Christmas Day in 1982. She claimed that he invited her into the room he was staying in at her family home during a visit, and touched her inappropriately on her breasts and “under her panties.”

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www.local10.com Police: Vandal spray paints ‘F--- Elon’ on 34 Tesla Cybertrucks in Fort Lauderdale

Vandals targeted row after row of Tesla Cybertrucks stored in a nondescript Fort Lauderdale parking lot in an apparent vendetta against the company’s controversial CEO, Elon Musk.

Police: Vandal spray paints  ‘F--- Elon’ on 34 Tesla Cybertrucks in Fort Lauderdale

Police said 34 new Tesla Cybertrucks were damaged. The owner parked the exotic cars in a parking lot in Fort Lauderdale.

In an apparent vendetta against Elon Musk, a vandal, or vandals spray-painted an expletive and his name — “F--- Elon” — on the ostentatious electric trucks starting at over $80,000 each.

“It was just one row and then it was a second row, and then a third row and a fourth row,” Adam Docktor, who works nearby, said.

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A heat wave is bringing searing temperatures to New York and the I-95 corridor. Washington DC has hit 100 degrees
www.cnn.com A heat wave is bringing searing temperatures to New York and the I-95 corridor. Washington DC has hit 100 degrees | CNN

A dangerous heat wave over the eastern US is bringing sweltering temperatrues to much of the US this weekend, including over parts of the Ohio Valley and mid-Atlantic. Meanwhile, a tropical system could develop this weekend through the southwest Gulf of Mexico. Here’s the latest:

A heat wave is bringing searing temperatures to New York and the I-95 corridor. Washington DC has hit 100 degrees | CNN

A dangerous heat wave is bringing sweltering temperatures to much of the US this weekend, including over parts of the Ohio Valley and mid-Atlantic. Meanwhile, a tropical system could develop this weekend through the southwest Gulf of Mexico.

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www.washingtonpost.com Trump cranks up false, inflammatory messages to rake in campaign cash

Democrats say fundraising emails falsely suggested he could be executed were tempting more violence.

Democrats say the fundraising emails falsely suggesting he could be executed were tempting more violence.

The fundraising pitch from Donald Trump was neither accurate nor subtle.

It read: “1 MONTH UNTIL ALL HELL BREAKS LOOSE! THEY WANT TO SENTENCE ME TO DEATH.”

The message blasted out to his supporters was a reference to the former president’s sentencing scheduled for July 11, when he faces fines or possible jail time after being convicted on 34 charges of business fraud in connection with hush money paid to an adult-film star. A death sentence is not under consideration in the case. Neither is a “GUILLOTINE,” as another fundraising pitch suggested last week.

The incendiary emails are part of a concerted strategy that has allowed the campaign to erase a financial lead that President Biden’s campaign had opened up in recent months, according to people close to the former president who spoke on the condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to speak for the campaign. But experts in small-dollar fundraising say the solicitations are aggressive even by the standards of Trump’s frequently hyperbolic and inflammatory language.

“I think those are clearly an escalation over and above some incredibly heated rhetoric and some irresponsible rhetoric we’ve seen over time,” said Matthew Hindman, a professor at George Washington University who studies digital emails. “The fact that those messages continue to be sent out tell us about something. The rhetoric has been driven by user response and user donations. If this extreme rhetoric continues to generate funds, it’s going to be rewarded with an even more extreme response next time.”

Non-paywall link

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newrepublic.com Samuel Alito’s Mysterious Absence From Supreme Court Raises Questions

Why is the Supreme Court justice missing from the bench two days in a row?

Samuel Alito’s Mysterious Absence From Supreme Court Raises Questions

Samuel Alito was again absent from the Supreme Court on Friday after skipping out on Thursday. No information has yet been provided by the court for Alito’s mysterious absence, which comes as the court is issuing decisions before the end of its term and leaves nothing but questions on his whereabouts.

Is he combating a hangover from a particularly raucous flag day with Martha-Ann? Is he ducking out to delay the decision on Trump’s presidential immunity case?

Alito’s absence poses the possibility that the Supreme Court will have to extend its term into July to complete its decisions for the term. One major case waiting in the wings is a decision on presidential immunity, which will decide if former presidents can extend immunity protections after they leave office—a determination that would greatly benefit Trump in his federal election interference case, currently still on hold.

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Texas congressman won’t stop wearing combat Infantryman Badge that was revoked
www.military.com Texas Congressman Won't Stop Wearing Combat Infantryman Badge that Was Revoked

More than a month after a news report revealed that the Combat Infantryman Badge Rep. Troy Nehls, R-Texas, wears on his lapel was revoked since he was never eligible for the award to begin with, the congressman refuses to take the pin off.

Texas Congressman Won't Stop Wearing Combat Infantryman Badge that Was Revoked

More than a month after a news report revealed that the Combat Infantryman Badge Rep. Troy Nehls, R-Texas, wears on his lapel was revoked since he was never eligible for the award to begin with, the congressman refuses to take the pin off.

Nehls' stubbornness has garnered growing criticism from veterans and others in the community of stolen valor researchers, who say the issue is simple: The rules for the CIB are clear, and Nehls did not qualify.

"The veteran community is starting to get to the point now where there's no room for forgiveness at this point because now they see, ‘Hey, this wasn't an error. He's doubling down now,’" said Anthony Anderson, an Army veteran who runs Guardian of Valor and was instrumental in uncovering Nehls' revoked award. "He knows he didn't earn this award."

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Claims of rigged system by convict Trump and allies ‘threaten rule of law’
  • Appreciate the recognition, Flying Squid. And I'll try to make it easier for people who skim.

  • A woman took her sick puppy to a Maryland shelter to be euthanized. The dog is up for adoption again.
  • The rescue’s reason:

    “LDCRF does not re-home an owner-surrendered dog with its former adopter/owner,” Floyd said in her written statement. “Our mission is to save adoptable and safe-to-the-community dogs from euthanasia.”

  • ADHD drug shortage shows signs of letting up, but some patients still struggle
  • From an earlier article referenced by this article:

    Drugmakers and the Drug Enforcement Administration, which regulates controlled substances, are pointing fingers at one another for the problem, said Erin Fox, senior pharmacy director at the University of Utah Health.

    Makers of ADHD drugs say they don’t have enough ingredients to make the drugs and need permission from the DEA to make more. The DEA is insisting that drugmakers have not met their quota for production and could make more of the drugs if they wanted. Adderall is a controlled substance regulated by DEA, which sets limits on how much of the active ingredient drugmakers are allowed to produce in a given time frame. Drugmakers must get approval from the DEA before they go over their quotas.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/adhd-drug-shortage-adderall-ritalin-focalin-vyvanse-rcna137356

  • 3 bodies in Mexican well identified as Australian and American surfers killed for truck's tires
  • Can confirm that Chichén Itzá is now roped off. And Yucatán is now the safest state in Mexico:

    Mexico’s lowest-crime region is strengthening its reputation as an oasis of calm in a country roiled by drug killings. Yucatán, the southeastern state known for its Mayan ruins, has a homicide rate more than 90% lower than the national average.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2023-05-10/how-did-yucatan-become-mexico-s-safest-state

  • Southeast Asian Americans face the brunt of racist attacks among Asians in U.S., new study finds
  • From the article, it's likely because they live and work in lower income areas:

    He said it’s hard to give one reason why Southeast Asians are feeling the brunt of this hate, but he thinks financial status might play a role. A 2020 report by the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center said that all Southeast Asian ethnic groups have a lower per capita income than the average in the U.S.

    “It depends on socioeconomics,” Chen said. “Where these people are living, where they’re commuting, where they’re working. That may be a factor as well.”

  • Biden Administration sets higher staffing mandates. Most nursing homes don’t meet them
  • What you’re saying tracks with the article as well:

    Charlene Harrington, a professor emeritus at the nursing school of the University of California-San Francisco, said: “In their unchecked quest for profits, the nursing home industry has created its own problems by not paying adequate wages and benefits and setting heavy nursing workloads that cause neglect and harm to residents and create an unsatisfactory and stressful work environment.”

  • US, Philippines kick off combat drills amid China tension
  • I don’t think so. There are other important parts in the article:

    For the first time, the annual event will also involve troops from the Australian and French military. Fourteen other countries in Asia and Europe will attend as observers. The exercises will run until May 10.

    The 2024 exercises are also the first to take place outside of Philippine territorial waters.

    "Some of the exercises will take place in the South China Sea in an area outside of the Philippines' territorial sea. It's a direct challenge to China's expansive claims" in the region, Philippine political analyst Richard Heydarian told DW.

    He added that some of the exercises this year will also be close to Taiwan.

    This year's exercises have a "dual orientation pushing against China's aggressive intentions both in the South China Sea but also in Taiwan," he added.

  • Netanyahu's outraged response after report of pending US sanctions on IDF
  • According to ProPublica, it’s commonly done using Leahy Laws:

    The recommendations came from a special committee of State Department officials known as the Israel Leahy Vetting Forum. The panel, made up of Middle East and human rights experts, is named for former Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., the chief author of 1997 laws that requires the U.S. to cut off assistance to any foreign military or law enforcement units — from battalions of soldiers to police stations — that are credibly accused of flagrant human rights violations.

    Over the years, hundreds of foreign units, including from Mexico, Colombia and Cambodia, have been blocked from receiving any new aid. Officials say enforcing the Leahy Laws can be a strong deterrent against human rights abuses.

    https://www.propublica.org/article/israel-gaza-blinken-leahy-sanctions-human-rights-violations

  • FBI says Chinese hackers are inside US infrastructure to cause ‘devastating blow’
  • Oh you mean the post summary. Yeah, that's the article's verbatim linked URL. Check the article's source and see for yourself.

    In any case, thanks for pointing that out. I've stripped the tracker link and updated the post summary portion.

  • FBI says Chinese hackers are inside US infrastructure to cause ‘devastating blow’
  • Huh? That’s the exact same link as the post’s.

  • Zelenskyy warns Russia has penetrated US politics, invites Trump to Ukraine
  • Wow the ads. I assumed everyone was already using some sort of ad blocker.

  • EPA imposes first national limits on 'forever chemicals' in drinking water
  • FWIW the most recent analysis I came across from a law professor makes me think the emergence of the "major questions doctrine" is more concerning:

    In Loper Bright Enterprises v. Raimondo, the US Supreme Court will decide whether to overrule one of its most frequently cited precedents—its 1984 opinion in Chevron v. NRDC. The decision in Loper may change the language that lawyers use in briefs and professors use in class, but is unlikely to significantly affect case outcomes involving interpretation of the statutes that agencies administer. In practice, it’s the court’s new major questions doctrine announced in 2021 that could fundamentally change how agencies operate.

    I am much more concerned about the court’s 2021 decision to create the “major questions doctrine” and to apply it in four other cases than I am about the effects of a potential reversal of Chevron in Loper. Lower courts are beginning to rely on the major questions doctrine as the basis to overturn scores of agency decisions. That doctrine has potential to make it impossible for any agency to take any significant action.

    https://news.bloomberglaw.com/us-law-week/courts-new-chevron-analysis-likely-to-follow-one-of-these-paths

  • *Permanently Deleted*
  • Good call. Thanks for letting me know.

  • Oregon city can't limit church's homeless meal services, federal judge rules
  • Kudos for doing additional research and sharing it with sources!

  • Supreme Court signals it is likely to reject a challenge to abortion pill access
  • Standing is a specific legal term that defines whether a party is allowed to sue, and injury is also a legal term in this case. Cornell Law School has a great intro on the legal requirements to establish standing using a 3-part test:

    • The plaintiff must have suffered an "injury in fact," meaning that the injury is of a legally protected interest which is (a) concrete and particularized and (b) actual or imminent
    • There must be a causal connection between the injury and the conduct brought before the court
    • It must be likely, rather than speculative, that a favorable decision by the court will redress the injury.

    In this case, seems to be the Supreme Court is skeptical that these doctors have satisfied this 3-part standing test, especially the injury in fact one. If SCOTUS decides that these doctors don't have standing, then the lawsuit is dismissed.

  • MicroWave MicroWave @lemmy.world

    Hi.

    I'm a bit of a news junkie.

    I'm also MicroWave on lemm.ee.

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